• NIGHT OF RETURNING SOULS

    NIGHT OF RETURNING SOULS

    license film
  • NIGHT OF RETURNING SOULS

    NIGHT OF RETURNING SOULS

    license film
  • NIGHT OF RETURNING SOULS

    NIGHT OF RETURNING SOULS

    license film
  • NIGHT OF RETURNING SOULS

    NIGHT OF RETURNING SOULS

    license film

NIGHT OF RETURNING SOULS

a film by Guido Nageldinger PhD

NIGHT OF RETURNING SOULS

Germany | 2010 | 77:30 min

Formal Categories

Human Interest Religion

Content Categories

Documentary
Der Film zeigt die „Dias de la Muerte“ und die mexikanische Interpretation des Todes.
Synopsis
For some people death represents the ultimate end of live and for others the transition into a new form of existence. The personal perception of death might be religiously motivated, however, its cultural interpretation is an integral part of today’s Mexican society. The „day of the death“ is in Europe celebrated as day in memory for the deceased once. In contemporary Mexico, the „Dias de la Muerte“, which are celebrated on the first and second of November each year, are not just a memorial day, as it is in Europe. A lot of families actually expect that the souls of the deceased once return to their graveyard. Therefore, most families create a little party for them. In Mexico a variety of customs, traditions and beliefs mix with the concepts of the dominant Catholic Church.

The documentary film entitled „Night of the returning souls“ focuses on the „Dias del Muerte“ and its cultural interpretations. The film illustrates the perception of the death by a variety of examples such as the mummies of Guanachuato, the famous Catrinas and the „holly lady death“ – La Santa Muerte. La Santa Muerte has frequently been quoted as saint of the drug lords. However, this populist perception is a misrepresentation of the syncretism present in Mexico and a variety of Central American countries. It is a fact that the Santa Muerte had been exhibited peacefully in a catholic church near the lake of Patzquaro until the figure has been looked away. Skeleton figures illustrated in a variety of newspapers are no exemplification of the Santa Muerte at all. They are interpretations of the Catrina, which is a female skeleton folk art figure, which was initially utilized by José Guadalupe Posada to joke about the rich and posh Mexican society.

Obviously, plenty of Pre-Columbian elements and believes are present still today and expressed in forms such as the Santa Muerte, which cannot be easily fitted into the catholic framework. However, but which Catholic Church likes to exhibit a Saint, which smokes Cuban Cigars and drinks whisky? This educational film is ideal for anybody whishing to explore mexican culture. Additionaly, it is one of the few films, which talks about the death in an artistic and entertaining manner.
Cast and Crew
  • Director Guido Nageldinger PhD (Nageldinger Film)
  • Director of Photography Guido Nageldinger PhD (Nageldinger Film)
Original Languages

German

Spanish

Production Company
Nageldinger Film | Dr. Guido Nageldinger
Luehedeich 12A, 21720 Grünendeich

Phone: +49 40 73679730

info03@nageldinger-film.de
http://www.nageldinger-film.de
Links / Reference
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